Lifestyle

Brindy survives against all odds

Brindy with her parents Rodney Taylor and Tamara Allcorn.
Brindy with her parents Rodney Taylor and Tamara Allcorn. John Mccutcheon

BRINDY Catherine-Anne Taylor is living proof that miracles happen.

Brindy was born without a heartbeat at 29 weeks after the placenta ruptured.

Tamara Allcorn had a very rare uterine malformation which meant she was always going to have a premature baby.

But she never imagined that her delivery would trump all the "horror stories" she had heard, putting her life and that of her unborn baby at risk.

Tamara, from Federal, said she had felt unwell while driving home from work and when the feeling did not pass called an ambulance.

Paramedics rushed her to Nambour General Hospital where obstetricians were waiting.

Tamara, 25, is a trained sonographer, so when the doctors were listening for the baby's heartbeat, she realised there wasn't one.

Doctors promptly broke her waters and four minutes later, Tamara gave birth to her 1390g baby girl.

Her partner, Rodney Taylor, recalls arriving at the hospital 10 minutes after Tamara not knowing if his wife and child would live.

"When I finally saw Tamara she told me doctors had delivered our baby," he said.

"I asked if she was alive and she said they were trying to save her life."

Brindy needed brief cardiac stimulation to start her heart again, and doctors said it was a miracle she was as healthy as she was.

"Most babies' lungs aren't developed before 32 weeks," Tamara said. "We were very lucky Brindy's were developed."

Mum and bub were taken to Royal Brisbane Women's Hospital two hours after the birth.

Brindy spent five weeks in the neonatal intensive care unit before being moved back to Nambour General Hospital for two weeks.

Tamara said she watched as her "little girl" was put on medication to fix the hole in her heart, given breathing assistance and kept under lights to fix her jaundice.

"I knew in my gut she was going to be fine, but it was the scariest experience of my life," she said.

To keep her mind off her daughter, Tamara returned to work six weeks later.

Now, Tamara is as healthy as any other one-month-old.

Tamara and Rodney said the doctors and nurses at both hospitals had been amazing and the level of care was second to none.

Doctors have told Tamara it is "too risky" for her to have another child, but given this miracle, the Coast couple are not giving up hope of giving Brindy a little brother or sister.

"I knew in my gut she was going to be fine, but it was the scariest experience of my life."

Topics:  birth, health, hospital, premature baby


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