MOVING GIFT: This vibration therapy train is looking to help create a shift in well being for all the Sunshine Butterflies.
MOVING GIFT: This vibration therapy train is looking to help create a shift in well being for all the Sunshine Butterflies. Peter Gardiner

A moving gift lifting quality of life in Noosa

OUR Backyard outside of Noosa is using good vibrations to enhance their quality of life to support people with disability.

Sunshine Butterflies' farmyard of fresh hope has just received a $30,000 boost to offer vibration therapy for the many young people using the facilities Leanne Walsh and her supporters have built from the ground up.

Niagra Therapy has donated an oversized toy train that vibrates, along with massaging recliner chair and even a vibrating animal blanket to help look after the four-legged therapy animals, to help give Our Backyard a real lift.

And Leanne knows from personal experience, the difference this equipment can make in the lives of families dealing with physical challenges.

She has seen the benefits first-hand in her son Curtis, who has cerebral palsy, whose spine "has corrected so many degrees just from the vibration therapy”.

The now 24-year-old, the catalyst for her forming Sunshine Butterflies after was born 13 weeks premature.

"He had acute scoliosis (sideways curvature of the spine) was about to get rods put in his back, but we tried the vibration therapy and it saved us from having a major operation.”

Leanne is keen to see how much benefit can be passed on to her families through the treatment

"This allows us to expand our services to now having therapy,” Leanne said.

Noosa-based movement specialist Ian O'Dwyer -said Niagara was "very much about stimulating how the tissues can repair and recover, once they've been stressed”.

He said this treatment offered major regeneration by making tissues relaxed to enable movement gains that are effective.

Ian has worked with Curtis with a noticeable improvement in his responses, but also his quality of life.

"He's had numerous operations to try and straighten various parts of his body, and about four years ago we got him on to vibration and he just melted and started to straighten to take the decompression out of his spine.”

His aim is for this therapy to make Curtis happier, move about safely and to more independent.

Leanne said the therapy equipment should make a significant difference to the daily routines of all those attending the facility.

"The equipment is evidence-backed practice for supporting circulation, removing toxins from the body and increasing blood flow.

"All of that is interrupted with some of those who depend on us, because their disability reduces their ability to move.

"It will really engage opportunities for the children and young adults who attend our programs to calmly transition through their day.”

For more on Sunshine Butterflies disability support services and programs, visit www.sunshinebutterflies. com.au.


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