Lifestyle

Baby owls rescued after their home was destroyed

Baby Barn Owls that had the tree they were living chopped down.
Baby Barn Owls that had the tree they were living chopped down. Zak Simmonds

THREE baby barn owls that became homeless after the tree they were living in was chopped down have been given a second chance.

The owlets are now being cared for by Deb Carter from NQ Birds of Prey after they were brought to her from Atherton.

The owlets are slightly underweight and one of them has a beak injury but they are otherwise healthy.

Ms Carter said the owls would stay with her for a couple of months before they were released back into the wild.

"They will have to grow feathers and I'll teach them to hunt," she said.

"I won't actually interact with them that much so they can grow up together as wild birds.

"I like to think of this as their second chance because if they were still at the bottom of that tree they would be dead."

Barn owls are common in North Queensland but their numbers are declining due to poison being ingested by their main source of food, mice.

Naming rights for the owlets will be given to some of the charity's most generous donors.

Birds of Prey are facing the busy raptor breeding season which runs from August to February and are in desperate need of donations.

To donate visit fight4flight.org.

Topics:  animal carer baby animals owl tree clearing

News Corp Australia

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