Bill shorten dabs on air.
Bill shorten dabs on air.

‘Humiliated’: Shorten opens up

HE DOESN'T regret it but opposition leader Bill Shorten has revealed there is one moment that left his children particularly "humiliated" - a cheeky dab thrown in at the end of a rap battle with radio host Ray Hadley.

The Labor leader opened up about the move that lit up social media following his rhyme to 50 Cent's In Da Club, saying while he didn't mind the embarrassment, "my kids do."

"I thought it was a good dab. [Daughter] Clementine said, "I can't go to school, you've humiliated me".

"It's bloody tough for the kids," he said about his "blended family" that includes two children from his wife, Chloe's, previous marriage as well as a daughter of their own.

"Families are not for the faint-hearted. But is it worthwhile? Absolutely. My kids have taught me more than I've taught them, I suspect."

"I spend a lot of my time thinking about my kids. I don't think the public really know that. I can take pleasure in small things, too. I don't need expensive cars or overseas trips. For me, summer's wearing shorts and not having to put on a suit or tie."

Bill Shorten in the March/April issue of GQ. Picture: Giuseppe Santamaria/GQ
Bill Shorten in the March/April issue of GQ. Picture: Giuseppe Santamaria/GQ

In a wideranging interview for the March/April issue of GQ magazine, the opposition leader, 50, described Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull as "vacuous" and revealed his strict running regimen that has seen him clock up 2000km in each of the last two years despite coming last in the cross-country races at school.

He said he is "much more positive" than his public persona allows and he loves the mundane parts of family life like cleaning up after the dogs and "doing the shopping".

The man who became Labor leader in 2013 slammed Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull for not explaining the benefits of the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) to Aussie voters.

"Oh mate, the guy is vacuous ... Great guy to have a dinner party with - though he'd do most of the talking - but just vacuous," he said.

He also berated the PM for not taking an active enough role in the same-sex marriage debate, where he said he "decided to compromise my objection to the lawmaking process and just fight."

"[Turnbull] didn't exactly work up a sweat, did he? There's a difference between playing sport, and going to the fridge for a beer and watching it, isn't there?"

Bill Shorten, and deputy leader Tanya Plibersek. Picture: AAP Image/David Crosling
Bill Shorten, and deputy leader Tanya Plibersek. Picture: AAP Image/David Crosling

 

Speaking about his personal influences, Mr Shorten said he is "most comfortable" with working people and is not motivated by money.

He admitted the last time he cried was in April 2014 when his mum passed away and glossed over the "terrible period" in the Labor party in which Julia Gillard was made leader after a coup against Kevin Rudd.

He said he now feels responsible for promoting more women and bringing long-term thinking back to Australian politics.

"My loyalties are to my family, the nation and my party - in that order. Personalities and egos can never get so out of whack that they stop you governing and following the interests of your people," he said.

"I don't think 2017 was the best year for Australian politics. A third of Australians don't want to vote for major parties. There's a message in that for all of us. I share some of the responsibility for the year that was. We got consumed into issues that the politicians thought were important, but don't speak to the lives of people. If there's one thing I'd like at the end of my time in politics, it's for people to come up and say, 'You weren't just in it for yourself'.

 

Read the full interview in the GQ March/April issue on sale Monday 05 March.

 

The March/April issue of GQ.
The March/April issue of GQ.

 

 

 

Visiting a tram depot in February. Picture: AAP Image/Tracey Nearmy.
Visiting a tram depot in February. Picture: AAP Image/Tracey Nearmy.
The dab that left his kids “humiliated”.
The dab that left his kids “humiliated”.

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