Chemical tanker Tintomara has been detained off the Queensland coast in Gladstone due to alleged labour breaches.
Chemical tanker Tintomara has been detained off the Queensland coast in Gladstone due to alleged labour breaches. Matt Taylor GLA250218

UPDATE: Tintomara detainment lifted after chief, captain removed

UPDATE February 27, 10.30am:

CHEMICAL tanker the Tintomara has had its detainment lifted by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority.

The Hong Kong owned flag of convenience ship, flying a Liberian flag, left Auckland Point Wharf last night.

An AMSA spokesperson said its investigation found the ship complied with Maritime Labour Convention international standards and the minimum manning requirements.

She said the crew were happy to return to work, after the chief officer and captain - accused of bullying and harassment - were removed from the ship.

 

February 26, 4.30pm:

THE owners of Tintomara, the ship that had its captain and chief removed for bullying crew, has promised to increase wages and decrease working hours for its 26 crew members.

Far East Management signed an industrial agreement with the International Transport Federation today after allegations of harassment and bullying on board were substantiated.

The ship has been detained by Australian Maritime Safety Authority since last week when the crew refused to return on board, claiming mistreatment by the chief oficer and captain.

The Maritime Labour Convention was also involved in the investigation into the treatment of workers, which was described by the ITF as "barbaric" and "horrific".

An MLC auditor removed the captain from the flag of convenience ship, flying a Liberian flag, on Sunday night, after the chief was removed on Friday.

ITF national coordinator Dean Summers said the contract, signed by the union and ship owner, was a well thought out and well planned industrial agreement.

It included what the ITF considers a fair wage within the international shipping industry, decent accommodation and a limit of nine months at sea.

Chemical tanker Tintomara has been detained off the Queensland coast in Gladstone due to alleged labour breaches.
Chemical tanker Tintomara has been detained off the Queensland coast in Gladstone due to alleged labour breaches. Matt Taylor GLA250218

It's believed the crew were receiving less than the average seafarer's wage of $3.50 an hour and were sleeping in double bunks in one room. 

Mr Summers said there were 140 ITF inspectors globally to ensure the company followed the agreement.

To reassure the crew's worries about leaving Australia, the contract included an indemnity form.

"The company has agreed to sign that to say no seafarers will be punished, banned from work or further intimidated after the action taken (at Gladstone)," he said. "I hope the company takes this seriously, because we do.

"When ships come to Australia and they chose to use dirty flags like Liberia, our response is to have them regulated under an industrial agreement."

Gladstone MP Glenn Butcher said the "concerning" workplace treatment highlighted conditions that were rife in the shipping industry.

Mr Butcher said the behaviour of "rogue" operators showed the need for mining companies exporting commodities to support using Australian shippers and seafarers.

"As an assistant member of the Palaszczuk Government, we want to make sure anyone coming into a port in Queensland is looked after," he said.

"The last thing we want is deaths on these ships."

An AMSA spokesperson said there was no evidence of a lack of food and water on the Tintomara while in the Port of Gladstone.

She said the crew were paid the amount as per their contracts, but were about two weeks late.

The ship will remain detained at Gladstone until AMSA is satisfied it is safe for the crew to sail.


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