CLEAN, CRISP AND COMING HERE: More swell is expected to reach the Sunshine Coast over the next few days. This photo was taken at Currimundi on August 17.
CLEAN, CRISP AND COMING HERE: More swell is expected to reach the Sunshine Coast over the next few days. This photo was taken at Currimundi on August 17. Brett Wortman

Buckle up: we’re in for wild weather

ROUGH weather and heavy seas will hit the Sunshine Coast today. But the region has missed the explosiveness of an east-coast low, the impact of which can have all the force of a summer cyclone.

Surfers who have packed points at Noosa, Alexandra Headland, Point Cartwright and Moffat Headland since the weekend can expect seas ranging from 2.5m to 3.5m from a more southerly direction.

The Bureau of Meteorology has predicted showers and thunderstorms.

August has been a wet month with more than 206mm falling to date at Sunshine Coast Airport compared with the 20-year average of 76mm.

This month has been the wettest August since 2007, when 427mm fell across the Coast.

Forecaster Gordon Banks said an upper-level low-pressure system was moving towards Queensland from central NSW and would result in more instability before rapid improvement tomorrow.

The unsettled weather will result from cool mid-level air carried by the upper level system settling over warmer air below it.

The east-coast low has moved south from near Fraser Island and late yesterday was sitting out over the South Coral Sea, bringing heavy weather to the NSW central coast.

Mr Banks said the surf would start to ease tomorrow. The Sunshine Coast can expect stable conditions from late in the day and then stable conditions with fine sunny days and cooler nights through to next Tuesday.

Sunshine Coast local disaster co-ordinator Andrew Ryan said the expected east-coast low would not directly affect the region.

"However, council will monitor Bureau of Meteorology advice regarding its movement, and in particular monitor any large swells that could cause beach erosion or the closure of beaches for public safety,'' Mr Ryan said.

Noosa Council emergency management spokesman Alan Rogers said he had been concerned about the potential for the east-coast low to cause real damage after 150mm of rain fell in the upper catchment on the weekend.

"There's no doubt they can pack a punch,'' Mr Rogers said.

He rated the winter-weather phenomenon as potentially more dangerous than summer cyclones because there was usually much less advance warning of their presence.

- BILL HOFFMAN


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