AN "EXPLODING" midge population at Currimundi Lake has forced Sunshine Coast Council to bite back.

From today, the lake will be kept at high tide level for six weeks, to inundate low-lying areas in the catchment and drown the biting midge larvae.

Up to 8000 cubic metres of sand will be shifted to block the flow of water between the lake and the ocean.

The decision followed a spike in the number of the irritating insects the area, divisional councillor Peter Cox said.

He expected a 95% success rate.

"Recently we've noticed a higher than usual increase and a wider distribution across the lake," he said.

"Our monitoring predicts a significant hatch of adult biting midge in spring, something that we haven't seen for more than a few years.

"If we don't manually intervene, life around this particular little catchment does become pretty intolerable."

Erosion along the banks of the lake has been a long-standing concern for local environment groups.

However, Cr Cox said the impact of the midges had to be taken into account.

"If we're concerned purely with the environment, we probably wouldn't undertake this," he said.

The lake will still be open for recreational use during the next six weeks.


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