Renee Pilcher

Council urges baiting and trapping of wild dogs

ALL landowners should bait or trap wild dogs on their properties wherever possible, Gympie Deputy Mayor Tony Perrett said yesterday.

Cr Perrett said landowners needed to target "not only breeding season but when pups start to travel about".

"That's when they're most vulnerable and not as wised up," he said.

Targeting young animals gave landowners a better chance of reducing wild dog populations affecting their properties, he said.

PROBLEM: Mooloo farmer Jim Tomkins with some of the animals he is trying to protect from wild dogs and (right) Deputy Mayor Tony Perrett with one of the free wild dog traps to be given away at a series of workshops next week.
PROBLEM: Mooloo farmer Jim Tomkins with some of the animals he is trying to protect from wild dogs and (right) Deputy Mayor Tony Perrett with one of the free wild dog traps to be given away at a series of workshops next week.

 

Mooloo farmer Jim Tompkins keeps his animals secure at night where he can.

"I do have a problem; they kill my sheep and attack my cows," he said.

He said he put bells on his sheep and if they rang it meant the sheep had been disturbed and were probably under attack.

Conservationists argued that the indiscriminate effects of baiting and trapping could contribute to the problem by disrupting pack behaviour and discipline.

But Cr Perrett urged landowners to attend information workshops at community halls next Tuesday at Kandanga, Wednesday at Tansey and Thursday at Wolvi.

Environment councillor Wayne Sachs said wild dogs and other pest animals had a real impact and the workshops were a chance for landowners to learn the finer points of trapping.

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