New Lime Scooter unveiled
New Lime Scooter unveiled

Crucial change coming to new Lime scooters

E-SCOOTERS that are promoted as less likely to tip over will hit Brisbane's streets in coming weeks, as Lime looks to woo council to lift current limits on e-scooter numbers.

The new Lime-S Gen 3 will be rolled out in two weeks' time, with the company claiming it can go 50 hours on a single battery.

Among improvements is the relocation of the battery to underneath the scooter base, reportedly giving it a lower centre of gravity that Lime claimed has made accidents "less likely."

A pamphlet also notes that the 10-inch tires "allow the rider to cruise through potholes without falling."

Adam Richardson tested one of the brand new Lime Scooters in the Brisbane Botanic Gardens. Picture: Lachie Millard
Adam Richardson tested one of the brand new Lime Scooters in the Brisbane Botanic Gardens. Picture: Lachie Millard

"This scooter is designed for safety and built for sharing," Lime head of government relations Mitchell Price said.

"We're investing several millions of dollars into this new hardware in Brisbane, and that's confirming our commitment to the city and to Australia," Mr Price said.

The new scooter also includes a larger LED screen that shows riders speed limits and where they can and can't park.

It comes as the company heads off fresh competition from Neuron Mobility, which has 600 scooters in Brisbane.

Under current Brisbane City Council rules, only 1,000 scooters can be on the streets at any time, with 400 allocated to Lime.

Lime head of government relations Mitchell Price said the new Gen 3 scooter was safer than previous models. Picture: Lachie Millard
Lime head of government relations Mitchell Price said the new Gen 3 scooter was safer than previous models. Picture: Lachie Millard

Mr Price said he hoped the new scooter's safety features would convince council to increase the limit.

"I hope that we can restart the conversation with Brisbane City Council around the optimal scooter number for the city," he said.

Mr Price said he believed 1,500 scooters would be a suitable limit, but said new measures like allowing scooters in bike lanes and some roads with lower speed limits should also be considered.

Newmarket resident Adam Richardson, 23, trialled the new scooter today and said he noticed it felt more sturdy.

"The actual deck seems bigger and it seemed a bit more controlled than the smaller ones," Mr Richardson said.


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