BRAND AESTHETIC: Anthony McKenzie checks out one of his creations, a 2001 Yamaha SR400 Custom known as The Duke.
BRAND AESTHETIC: Anthony McKenzie checks out one of his creations, a 2001 Yamaha SR400 Custom known as The Duke.

Custom motorcycle maker rides the social media wave

CUSTOM motorcycles are cool.

Throw in beautifully composed photos of bespoke bikes being built and then ridden on deserted roads and things get cooler still.

Businesses large and small need to master their brand and image on social media, and for Noosaville independent motorcycle workshop Makarne, the likes of Facebook and Instagram play key roles in promotion.

Makarne is a one-man operation owned by bike customiser Anthony Mackenzie.

His shop is tucked away alongside other small businesses including a surfboard shaper, photo studio and clothes retailer.

Despite producing only eight custom motorcycles under the Makarne name since its inception, the brand is far-reaching thanks to 1367 Makarne Instagram followers and 1469 Facebook likes.

Mr Mackenzie is modest about his talent with a camera and in creating an enticing brand aesthetic, which is as impressive as the beautiful custom work he performs

on motorcycles.

"These days people want to buy into a brand rather than something that is mass produced and disposable," he said.

"It's important to keep potential customers interested by posting day to day relevant happenings: a bike in the workshop, custom parts, apparel and anything else I think people would be in to."

One thing's for sure, Mr Mackenzie knows how to make building custom motorcycles look like an appealing job. .


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