THAT’S BETTER: Brendan Raggett seen here with his children, Callum,11, Kelsey, 9, and Jonty, 9 months, has started a Facebook campaign to let kids be kids.
THAT’S BETTER: Brendan Raggett seen here with his children, Callum,11, Kelsey, 9, and Jonty, 9 months, has started a Facebook campaign to let kids be kids. Nicola Brander

Cut the rubbish and let kids be kids: Dad hits back

A CURRIMUNDI dad and former school teacher has started a social media campaign to bring fun back into playgrounds, classrooms and the backyard.

Brendan Raggett's Facebook page, Bring Back Bullrush and other great activities, attracted more than 400 members in one day.

The page is "dedicated to all those members of society that like me can see the red tape strangling the life out of kids in the playground".

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He says it is time to "bring back bullrush and cartwheels" and members have been posting up images of people doing outdoor activities involving some element of danger, like sand boarding, trampolining and climbing rocks. Bullrush, also known as red rover, is a physical chasing game.

Mr Raggett was prompted to start the page after reading the Daily's Tuesday edition which first revealed the handstand and cartwheel limitations at Peregian Springs State School.

The story has since prompted criticism from across Australia and featured on early morning national prime television.

Mr Raggett, formerly from New Zealand, said he quit teaching as he was tired of having to say "no" to kids for fear of litigation.

"It's going over the top, and we wonder why are kids are bored and using electronics," Mr Raggett said.


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