An Australian father who served jail time in a bitter tug-of-love case fears he may never see his son again.
An Australian father who served jail time in a bitter tug-of-love case fears he may never see his son again.

Dad’s fears for son after Bali custody battle

An Australian father who served jail time in a bitter tug-of-love case fears he may never see his son again.

Alistair Larmour, of Byron Bay, spent two years in Bali's Rutan Gianyar jail for his son's abduction.

But in the time he was behind bars, he claims his former partner took his baby Andrew away for good.

"I have not slept properly for years now, I worry constantly for Andrew's welfare," said the desperate dad.

Alistair Larmourd on his macadamia farm in Main Arm, northern NSW. Picture: Elise Derwin
Alistair Larmourd on his macadamia farm in Main Arm, northern NSW. Picture: Elise Derwin

The 42-year-old has not seen his son since April 2018 when he was arrested over the abduction and spends his grief-filled days working hard on a sprawling macadamia farm on the New South Wales north coast.

"I just needed to meditate and get as close to nature as possible. The prison was terrible. I meditated for between four and six hours a day to get through it," he said.

"Not having Andrew in my life has left a hole in me that I don't know how to fill."

Alistair Larmour with his former partner Agnieszka Krzysztofowicz, the mother of his young son. Picture: Alistair Larmour
Alistair Larmour with his former partner Agnieszka Krzysztofowicz, the mother of his young son. Picture: Alistair Larmour

Andrew, who is now three years old, was a 15-month-old toddler when Larmour took him from the Ubud home of his mother and ex lover - Agnieszka (Agnes) Krzysztofowicz, a Polish national, in a midnight grab.

The former Melbourne life coach and meditation teacher said he had previously not seen his son for 10 months and accused Ms Krzysztofowicz of withholding access to his own baby.

In Bali, he pleaded guilty to the 2018 abduction of Andrew and was handed a sympathetic sentence of one year, despite the prosecutor calling for an eight-year custodial term.

After an appeal by the prosecutor, it was increased to two years.

The former couple with newborn son Andrew. Picture: Alistair Larmour
The former couple with newborn son Andrew. Picture: Alistair Larmour

"Andrew should be an Australian citizen. Had Agnes co-operated with me to have Andrew registered as Australian it would have been an easy administrative process. I begged the officials at the consulate to make him Australian but they rejected the application. Nobody did anything until I was found guilty of abduction. Even then they failed," he said.

Despite being named as his father on his Polish birth certificate, there have been two separate passports for Andrew with different details.

The first showed his name as Larmour. The second referenced his mother's surname, in a move which legally separated father and son, making the abduction charges possible.

Alistair Larmour with his son Andrew, who he has not seen since April 2018. Picture: Alistair Larmour/Facebook
Alistair Larmour with his son Andrew, who he has not seen since April 2018. Picture: Alistair Larmour/Facebook

"I hope you get that I cannot kidnap my own child. This is a very big deal to me. You are seeing very dodgy paperwork around this case," Mr Larmour said regarding the Polish documents acquired by News Corp.

Alistair Larmour arrives for his first trial at the Gianyar District Court in Bali. Picture: Lukman Bintoro/ News Corp Australia
Alistair Larmour arrives for his first trial at the Gianyar District Court in Bali. Picture: Lukman Bintoro/ News Corp Australia

Mr Larmour said that after he and Ms Krzysztofowicz - who was diagnosed with post-natal depression - separated, he returned to Australia to make some money so he could retain an Indonesian lawyer to fight for access to Andrew.

"I went back to Bali to try to get my son back but the law in Bali just doesn't work and it leads to desperate situations. All I want is to be Andrew's dad," said Mr Larmour who kept Andrew for four days after he took him from Ubud.

"I do not know where they (Agnes and Andrew) are (now) - if they are in Poland or Bali."

The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade failed to answer News Corp's questions about the case despite several approaches.

Mr Larmour said that the Government has also denied his requests for documentation regarding the rejection of Andrew's residency application process through the Freedom of Information Act.

Originally published as Dad's fears for son after Bali custody battle


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