Nine alleged bikies accused of murdering innocent man Jason De Ieso want to see the top-secret files about them.
Nine alleged bikies accused of murdering innocent man Jason De Ieso want to see the top-secret files about them.

Murder case involves top intelligence officer

The second-most senior figure in Australian criminal intelligence has become involved in the Jason De Ieso murder case - and in a push to reveal secrets about his alleged killers.

On Thursday, counsel for nine men charged with the murder pressed their bid to see classified Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission dossiers about their clients.

The commission's lawyer, Paul D'Assumpcao, gave the Adelaide Magistrates Court a sealed envelope containing a password-protected USB with some material - but said there was more to come.

"There will be an affidavit, deposed to by a very senior level of the ACIC - one rung down from the chief executive," he said.

A screengrab from CCTV showing the moments leading up to the shooting murder of Jason De Ieso in 2012.
A screengrab from CCTV showing the moments leading up to the shooting murder of Jason De Ieso in 2012.

"This case touches upon matters of public interest immunity, and the High Court has previously ruled it's appropriate such matters be deposed to by high-level officials.

"The official, Matt Griffin, has a busy schedule and we need to make time within his availability to brief him so he's content with the matters he will depose to."

Mr De Ieso was shot and killed during an attack upon his Pooraka workshop in November 2012.

The eight men are charged with his murder are:

Ross William Montgomery, 35

Daniel Mark Jalleh, 31

Musa Ali Alzuain, 27

Mohamed Alzuain, 28

Husain Ali Alzuain, 32

Kyle Lloyd Pryde, 32

Nicholas Sianis, 33

Seywan Moradi, 33

Each man is accused of being a member or an associate of the Hells Angels motorcycle gang.

The ACIC is a national agency that gathers intelligence on illegal activities ranging from organised crime and drug trafficking to fraud and money laundering.

Failure to answer questions at its coercive hearings is punishable by prison term.

Last month, the court ordered the ACIC hand over all the information it had obtained about the defendants so it could be read by Magistrate Brett Dixon.

However, Mr Dixon has yet to decide whether he will release that material to defence counsel.

On Thursday, Mr D'Assumpcao asked for a three-week adjournment in order to provide Mr Griffin's affidavit.

"I accept that might be generous, but we seek the court's indulgence so we can properly provide the guts of the material to the court," he said.

Jim Pearce QC, prosecuting, said three weeks was too long.

"The delays in this case are promoting one bail application after another (by the defendants)," he said.

"The constant refrain, from defence counsel, is that bail should be granted because of delay … this is, for the prosecution, death by a thousand cuts.

"For that reason I baulk at this request … it may be petty but each week, fortnight, month-long adjournment adds up … this matter needs to progress."

Mr Dixon said that was a "well-made" point, but he saw no purpose in trying to force the ACIC to move more quickly.

He adjourned the case until next month, when he will hear argument about releasing the information.

Originally published as De Ieso murder case involves top intelligence officer

Murder victim and innocent bystander Jason De Ieso.
Murder victim and innocent bystander Jason De Ieso.

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