Divorces set to soar after couples isolate

DIVORCES are set to skyrocket following the coronavirus isolation period as couples are forced to spend 24/7 together.

Issues like finances, stress and poor communication could compound and put pressure on already strained relationships according to those in the know who are anticipating a rise in marriages ending post-isolation.

Marie Fedorov, Director at Fedorov Family Lawyers at Burleigh Heads who specialises in family law said many couples were about to realise "they had little in common".

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Marie Federov, Director of Fedorov Family Lawyers said there will be an increase of divorces after isolation.
Marie Federov, Director of Fedorov Family Lawyers said there will be an increase of divorces after isolation.

"There are many unhappy couples out there living together either for the sake of their children, because they fear change and for financial and security reasons," she said.

"Some people are like ships in the night so don't really spend too much time together so they can tolerate one another in small doses."

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She said isolation for some meant losing jobs, being stood down or transitioning to a work from home arrangement resulting in both people in a relationship being at home 24 hours a day seven days a week.

"Throw home schooling into the mix and not being able to have a break and socialise with your friends and we are going to have a lot of unhappy people causing pressure on relationships," she said.

Spouse driving you mad during isolation? Might be time to phone a lawyer.
Spouse driving you mad during isolation? Might be time to phone a lawyer.

Ms Fedorov already saw an increase in people consulting her about a separation prior to the isolation so they were not forced to spend time with someone they no longer got along with.

"Some people are wanting to exit relationships before potential lock downs," she said.

"Isolation not only means being isolated together but also means being isolated away from your family and friends.

"Often these people are the support network that helps one to get through issues that arise in a relationship.

"Without these support people, the isolation can lead to power imbalances and ultimately domestic violence and separation."

Lawyer Marie Fedorov said many couples can only tolerate each other in small doses.
Lawyer Marie Fedorov said many couples can only tolerate each other in small doses.

Clinical Psychologist Dr Susan Edwards from Burleigh Heads Psychology said stress during these uncertain times could lead to an increase in arguments and friction within a household.

"We are seeing increased anxiety and depression in so many people right now," she said.

"With lots more time contained in our four walls at home to think and in isolation, it really is the perfect storm for anxiety and depression to escalate," she said.

"Families confined inside for long periods, kids being off school, parents trying to work from home, increases in stress leading to increases in arguments and friction.

"It is taking it's toll on so many of us at the moment."

"Increases in domestic violence are also being seen and the number of people seeking help from domestic violence support services and social and counselling services have jumped."

"Don't try and manage it on your own if you are struggling."

Originally published as Divorces set to soar after couples isolate


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