Doctor explains logic behind virus testing

 

As the number of coronavirus cases in Australia continues to rise, one Melbourne doctor has explained why not everyone can be tested.

Dr Preeya Alexander, also known as The Wholesome Doctor, says GPs are being inundated with patients asking to be tested for COVID-19 but most do not fit the necessary criteria.

"Currently we are not testing everyone, and whilst this may change in the future, at the moment this isn't feasible. The pressure on labs would be mammoth and the yield is likely low," she said on Instagram.

Dr Alexander said patients needed to have either a history of international travel or to have been in close contact with a confirmed case.

"The patient also needs symptoms consistent with the virus such as fever or cough. These are the current GP guidelines for testing in Australia," she said.

A total 126 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed across Australia, with 64 in New South Wales, 18 in Victoria, 17 in Queensland, 8 in South Australia, 7 in Western Australia and 2 in Tasmania.

 

 

Frydenberg grilled on 7.30

Alle McMahon

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg took a beating on 7.30 last night, as host Leigh Sales grilled him about the now wiped out budget surplus.

"Last year you were claiming credit for a surplus that you had not yet delivered, saying the Budget was back in black," Sales said.

"You were warned global events could derail that prospect, which they now have. What does your premature rush to claim credit for a phantom surplus say about your political maturity and judgement?"

"Well, we took the best possible advice and based on the forecasts at the time and we have delivered a balanced Budget," Mr Frydenberg replied.

"As for a surplus, we've made it very clear and the PM made it very clear today we have now taken these major spending decisions and surplus won't arrive in 19-20 as a result of some of these circumstances we've seen."

But Sales then reminded Mr Frydenberg that last year he was insistent the surplus would be safe in the event of a national or global crisis.

"I want to play our audience something from around the time of the Budget last year," Sales said, rolling footage from his interview on April 2.

"Like any projection, your ability to deliver that $7 billion surplus is reliant on factors that are outside your control. It might not happen," Sales had warned.

"No, it will happen. And it's the product of bringing the spending under control," Frydenberg had promised.

In another interview on Sky News, David Speers had cautioned: "There might be a collapse in China or a terrible drought, write down the NBN. Things can happen that could prevent you actually achieving this?"

But again Mr Frydenberg was clear: "There's not a wafer-thin surplus. This is a very significant surplus".

Responding to the footage, Mr Frydenberg said: "Well, we maintain those were the forecasts at the time … What we could not foresee and what you couldn't foresee and what the global economy couldn't foresee was this one-in-a-century event, the spread of the coronavirus which is putting the shutters up on the global economy."

  2h agoMarch 13, 2020

Wilkinson describes feeling in America

Alle McMahon

Australian television host Lisa Wilkinson says America "feels like it's shutting down" as the country steps up its response to the coronavirus outbreak.

"I don't know how much longer these borders are going to be open," she said on Instagram on Thursday.

"Australia, here I come… Be safe everyone. Wash your hands. And look after each other.

Wilkinson said she was in the United States for a "major celeb interview" set to air on The Project.

More than 1,300 cases of the COVID-19 disease have been confirmed across the US and 38 people have died.

  2h agoMarch 13, 2020HIGHLIGHT

Why are only some people being tested?

Alle McMahon

Dr Preeya Alexander, also known as The Wholesome Doctor on Instagram, has explained why only some people are being tested for the coronavirus despite GPs being inundated with requests.

"Currently we are not testing everyone, and whilst this may change in the future, at the moment this isn't feasible," she explained in a post.

"The pressure on labs would be mammoth and the yield is likely low."

Dr Alexander said patients needed to have either a history of international travel or to have been in close contact with a confirmed case.

"The patient also needs symptoms consistent with the virus such as fever or cough," she said.

"Every doctor has discretion on who they test but this is the current guide right now."

A total 126 cases of coronavirus have now been confirmed across Australia, with 64 in New South Wales, 18 in Victoria, 7 in Queensland, 8 in South Australia, 7 in Western Australia and 2 in Tasmania.

 

 

 

 

 

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