GOOD BOY: RSPCA Noosa's Kitty O'Brien with Duke await the arrival of his new ‘forever home’.
GOOD BOY: RSPCA Noosa's Kitty O'Brien with Duke await the arrival of his new ‘forever home’.

DOGGONE: Overwhelming adoption numbers at RSPCA Noosa

WITH close to 800 animals adopted in the space of three days, it's safe to say the RSPCA has had a successful weekend.

Noosa RSPCA's second-in-charge Kitty O'Brien was overwhelmed with the response from their 'Clear the Shelter' campaign where families could take home a 'forever pet' for only $29.

"The last couple of days have been amazing," she said.

"We have had so many people through."

 

GOOD BOY: RSPCA Noosa's Kitty O'Brien with Duke shaking hands for his treat.
GOOD BOY: RSPCA Noosa's Kitty O'Brien with Duke shaking hands for his treat.

From Friday February 21 to Sunday February 23, RSPCAs across Queensland adopted out close to 800 animals as part of the Clear the Shelters promotion,

Noosa's RSPCA shelter found loving homes for over 55 dogs, cats and even two guinea pigs.

"The shelter fills up quickly with strays and private surrenders," Ms O'Brien said.

"This promotion gives a chance for the long time animals to get a home.

 

 

‘It is hard to see them go but is a joy knowing they are going to a good home.’ Noosa RSPCA's Kitty O'Brien says her goodbyes to Duke before he leaves with his new family.
‘It is hard to see them go but is a joy knowing they are going to a good home.’ Noosa RSPCA's Kitty O'Brien says her goodbyes to Duke before he leaves with his new family.

While the cost to take home a new family member may have dropped during the three days, the same stringent RSPCA procedures applied.

"They all go through vet checks, desexing, microchipped and behavioural testing (for the dogs)," Ms O'Brien said.

"They need to pass all that before they go to their new home."

A passionate animal lover and RPSCA employee for over 20 years, Ms O'Brien advised, contrary to rumours, RSPCA will only euthanase animals in very rare situations.

"We keep trying to tell everybody there is no time limit for any of the animals," she said.

"The only time we ever have to, and it's a very small percentage, is with major health issues that are either untreatable or unmanageable, or there is aggression problems," she said.

Even after two decades, Ms O'Brien said she still finds it hard to say goodbye to the animals when they leave with their new family.

"It is hard to see them go but is a joy knowing they are going to a good home," she said.


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