As a driver, I always try to comply but the bit that gets me is if I was the cyclist, would I push the point and risk injury?
As a driver, I always try to comply but the bit that gets me is if I was the cyclist, would I push the point and risk injury? RACQ

Don't get me started on my cycling gripes

THE impact of population on Coast transport is a hot topic and one of the most divisive subjects is cyclists and what rights they actually have on the roads.

Something that never ceases to amaze me is cyclists who try to prove a point with motorists, either by holding their ground, go-pro recording or whatever it takes to prove they are in the right - that the guy in the truck has to wait for the two or three- abreast lycra-clad riders to go wherever they are going, whenever they are ready.

As a driver, I always try to comply but the bit that gets me is if I was the cyclist, would I push the point and risk injury?

No way.

I am bringing up this topic because of the next one down the food chain from the cyclist - the pedestrian.

Over the last few years the local council has been obsessed with the coastal bike path, which is all fine as long as you don't live along the coastal beachfront and your view of the bushland or sand dunes has been replaced by a concrete path that has every Tom, Dick and Harry riding, skating or walking past, gawking into your lounge window.

But that is not what is bothering me.

I believe the coastal bikeway/pathway should be renamed the "coastal velodrome".

The idea is fine. Beautiful pathways through natural coastal habitat is all good until you get lunatics doing 30-40kph, ringing their bell as they fly through what are now intersections where the pathway crosses long-established paths to the beach.

It is extremely dangerous and it is only a matter of time before a small child or elderly soul gets mowed down.

At Wurtulla, they have painted some warning signs on the pathway to alert all concerned but it is only on one intersection, leaving the others totally unbranded.

Maybe the idea is to see if it works but, sadly, will it take an accident on the others to do something about it?

I think more signage, such as upright ones actually alerting cyclists to stop, may work but probably the only solution is speed bumps at every section to make them actually slow down.

I really don't have the answer but I do know that something needs to be done.

A bit like the joggers in Noosa National Park, I think a big part of the solution is tolerance and patience.

I am just a little worried those two qualities have been bred out of us.


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