A Gympie letter writer worries the loss of printed newspapers will have far reaching consequences.
A Gympie letter writer worries the loss of printed newspapers will have far reaching consequences.

End of print ‘progress at a high price’

Loss of print newspaper is progress at a high price

 

MANY residents of Gympie and the surrounding region will be devastated by the recently announced decision to terminate the print edition of The Gympie Times, their almost daily local newspaper.

The News Corp decision to end the production of local newspapers in Gympie and many other rural centres is, no doubt, driven exclusively by economic considerations.

One big saving to the corporation will be the salaries of the many workers whose jobs will disappear in a few weeks' time.

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But, apart from the unemployment carnage, there are other serious losses for affected communities.

In Gympie, the major readership of the print version of the paper are elderly.

Many will not be able to access the digital format.

Consequently, and very sadly, they will be locked out of the local information cycle. Social distancing by corporate decision. The personal sense of alienation will be widespread.

Another regrettable consequence will be that community scrutiny of local government, law enforcement and other matters of significant public interest will be seriously diminished. Another blow to transparency and accountability.

Merv Welch says the decision is a blow to transparency and accountability.
Merv Welch says the decision is a blow to transparency and accountability.

In further damage to civic morale, there is the loss of a significant element of Gympie's communal identity.

The Gympie Times has, for generations, been part of the fabric of daily life - part of what we know and recognise as the place where we live and of which we are proud.

The pragmatists will argue that it is simply the inevitable march of progress.

But for many, it is progress at a high price.

Merv Welch, The Palms

 

Thanks for having a cuppa and supporting campaign

THIS May, thousands of Queenslanders had a cuppa for a cancer-free future, supporting our 27th Australia's Biggest Morning Tea fundraising campaign.

I would like to thank the countless Queensland residents, community groups and workplaces that made their cuppa count - not by simply hosting an event, making a donation or buying merchandise - but for truly giving hope to the 29,000 Queenslanders diagnosed with cancer each year.

One in two Queenslanders will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime and all funds raised from Australia's Biggest Morning Tea support our vital work in cancer research, prevention and support.

Cuppa movement a big winner, Qld Cancer Council says.
Cuppa movement a big winner, Qld Cancer Council says.

From hosting virtual morning teas with loved ones to businesses delivering delicious morning tea goodies to locals, the campaign looked a lot different this year.

Queenslanders have shown their incredible giving spirit and support for those impacted by cancer, especially during the current global pandemic.

I would also like to thank the many journalists and editors across Brisbane for their standout coverage and promotion of Australia's Biggest Morning Tea activities.

If you haven't hosted a morning tea yet, it's not too late. Queenslanders can host an Australia's Biggest Morning Tea across June too.

Chris McMillan, CEO, Cancer Council Queensland (abridged)

Gympie Times

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