Tracy Matesich, Catherine McNally, Frank McNally and Paul Matesich attended the Tewantin march and service.
Tracy Matesich, Catherine McNally, Frank McNally and Paul Matesich attended the Tewantin march and service. Amber Macpherson

PHOTOS: Families honour their history of service

COOROY: AN ESTIMATED 600 people attended yesterday's Anzac Day ceremony and march at Cooroy.

The march started at 10am with a host of military Jeeps and vintage cars leading the procession, while the walkers followed a pipe band and representatives of the local schools and military cadet groups.

Cooroy grey nomad Dave Hanschard made the special trip back to the town from his round Australia travels to make sure he made the march.

"I tried to get back there as much as possible especially in time for Anzac Day," Mr Hanschard said.

Mr Hanschard spent eight years with the local State Emergency Services and now travels with his wife and companion dog Minnie seeing the country.

"Do I miss the pager and the phones 24 hours a day? No," he said.

In a touching ceremony, students from each school attending came forward with name plaques representing each local person killed in action in wars.

TEWANTIN: TEWANTIN'S Anzac Day march and service was rich with history, as veterans and families came out to honour those who fought for the life we enjoy today.

From World War I to East Timor, each ex-service man and woman had a connection to wars fought in modern history, bound by the mateship forged on the battlefields.

Frank McNally attended the service to lay a wreath for his father, a Queenslander who fought at Gallipoli in the ninth battalion.

Mr McNally said his father, William McNally, was only one of few men in his battalion to return from war.

"After Gallipoli, there was only 100 survivors," Mr McNally said.

"He still had shrapnel in his leg when he came home. He used to show me."

 

Mr McNally was born after his father returned from war.

Mr McNally said he planned on following his family history of service and had begun training to fight in World War II, but missed out "by weeks".

"The War ended before I could be sent there," Mr McNally said.

"I missed out on being trained as a pilot. After that, I was too old for national service."

Mr McNally marched with his children who are also ex-service personnel.

"We like to think today is special for us," daughter Tracy Matesich said.

"We call it the family crest - we've all been involved in the services in a way."

Vietnam veteran John Clark came up from Coolangatta to visit family and march in the Tewantin service.

"I joined the Navy when I was 17, and that was the age you could join," Mr Clark said.

"(Anzac Day) is about remembrance - that's what it means. It means a lot."

It was a hot and humid morning as veterans and families marched down Poinciana Ave from 9am.

Two World War II veterans came out to join the procession, proudly displaying their medals on their chest.

As an old war plane and an F1 roared overhead, for a moment the crowd could vividly imagine the ear-piercing sounds of battle men and women heard in wars past, and continue to hear in wars today.


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