James Foley in Syria, 2012
James Foley in Syria, 2012

WE SAY: Fanatics’ atrocities ensure a response

IF EVER there remained a doubt about the danger posed by the fundamentalist fanatics in Syria and Iraq who call themselves Islamic State, there is none now.

Islamic State made international news last week when the photo of a young boy holding a severed head went viral.

The boy was reportedly the son of a militant from Australia fighting for the radical movement in northern Iraq.

The photo Khaled Sharrouf posted to Twitter of his Australian-born son in Syria, posing with severed heads.
The photo Khaled Sharrouf posted to Twitter of his Australian-born son in Syria, posing with severed heads.

Since then, the US has launched air attacks on the militants who reportedly are killing innocent people as they try to establish a radical, new state in the Middle East.

Then followed threats that the US would be bathed in blood, and the beheading of a US journalist - which was posted yesterday on the internet.

Islamic State's actions and words are a horror, an affront to the religion it purports to represent.

The actions of the insurgents - with all the complex political ramifications that go with them - may provoke more of a reaction from Islamic countries than the radicals expect.

And although the US is desperate not to become embroiled in another conflict in the area, its willingness to stay involved can only be galvanised by such actions. The same holds true for Australia, whether we like it or not.

Fighting for what you believe in is one thing, but murdering innocents to prove it, quite another.


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