As if the loss of six-week-old twins Violet and Indiana wasn’t tragic enough, a friend reveals the special significance they had for their parents.
As if the loss of six-week-old twins Violet and Indiana wasn’t tragic enough, a friend reveals the special significance they had for their parents.

Heartbreaking twist in tragic loss of twins

TWO little girls who died while co-sleeping with their mother in Brisbane's south last week were their parents' "last throw of the dice" to extend their family.

Violet and Indiana, aged six weeks, were critically injured while in bed at their Sunnybank Hills home last Wednesday.

Police have said their deaths are a tragic accident and are not being investigated further.

More than $20,000 has now been raised online in support of the family, which also includes a five-year-old girl and a two-year-old boy.

Family friend Kieran Garratt said the twins had been a blessing.

"They did want to extend their family and it was probably going to be the last throw of the dice for them, and they got blessed with two instead of one," he said.

"The oldest child is a girl, and she was pretty excited about having sisters.

"It was just a blessing and unfortunately it was just a blessing for six weeks.

"The family is not doing too well. They're extremely haunted and stunned by it all."

 

Violet and Indiana died tragically after being found unresponsive in bed at Sunnybank Hills
Violet and Indiana died tragically after being found unresponsive in bed at Sunnybank Hills

 

The family have since moved into the father's parents' house as they look to end their lease.

A coroner has also kept the girls for further investigation for longer than the family had anticipated, delaying their plans for a funeral.

The family's eldest child - who turned five this week - was very distressed when her parents informed her about what happened, Mr Garratt said.

Their brother, aged two, lives with "full spectrum" autism, Mr Garratt said, and the child also misses his sisters.

"They told the girl the truth and she was pretty upset," Mr Garratt said.

"The boy has been pretty hurt by it.

 

The girls were their parents’ last shot at expanding their family.
The girls were their parents’ last shot at expanding their family.

 

"He was always touching them very gently and in some ways he was more connected to them than his bigger sister.

"Being autistic he doesn't have a line of communication, if you like."

Mr Garratt said the family was staying away from technology to avoid becoming overwhelmed by the media coverage.

"They're not turning on the computers or television or anything. If they were on Facebook, it's definitely turned off now. They've blocked it all out," he said.

"The last few days from basically all around the world is starting to filter into them a little bit and maybe it's given them a little bit of light, I'm not sure."


Art show rubs salt into our past deeds

Art show rubs salt into our past deeds

New Noosa exhibition to make Australia reflect on what we’ve done to the...

Livestream: Noosa swimmers showcased this weekend

Livestream: Noosa swimmers showcased this weekend

Don't miss a bevy of talent when News will livestream the Gympie Gold Rush swim...

Arcade where games trigger Hasting St nostalgia

premium_icon Arcade where games trigger Hasting St nostalgia

New gaming arcade inspired by Noosa’s past cravings for Betty and her burgers.