Blue Heeler JanaBlue loves getting into things like this cushion, but she ended up in hospital after playing with a stick. Photo: Contributed
Blue Heeler JanaBlue loves getting into things like this cushion, but she ended up in hospital after playing with a stick. Photo: Contributed Contributed

How a dog playing with a stick ended up costing owner $800

THIS adorable blue-heeler's $800 vet bill should serve as a warning to think twice before letting your dog play stick on the beach.

Jude Rhodes, who works at Nambour General Hospital, had to rush her JanaBlue to the emergency vet service recently after she wouldn't stop vomiting.

The vet initially thought it was pancreatitis, but blood tests confirmed this wasn't the case.

"Because she was still vomiting, they put her under anaesthetic for an X-ray. That didn't turn anything up so they did surgery," Ms Rhodes said.

"They found the stick."

The small piece of stick less than four centimetres long somehow had wedged in the dog's lower end, blocking food from going out where it should.

"Her stomach was completely full, even though she hadn't eaten for two days, because the food hadn't been passing through," Ms Rhodes said.

Not only did the stick cause problems down under, but the vomiting caused "two ulcers at the top of oesophagus".

Ms Rhodes was lucky to walk away with only an $800 bill.

While she never allowed her dog to play stick, a stick was something it used to pick up on the daily walk.

Unfortunately, this type of incident is very common.

Nicklin Way vet Dr Melanie Irvine said people should never give their dogs sticks to play with as they regularly caused problems, either by perforating the top of the mouth, or by getting stuck.

However, sticks weren't the only foreign objects Dr Irvine had to remove from the bowel of a dog.

"Corn cobs are pretty common," she said.

"I've also had to remove used feminine hygiene products (mostly tampons) and the pad from meat trays."

Tampons posed a tricky problem when eaten by a dog as they swelled inside and could be really dangerous.

Last week a maltese had to have emergency surgery after swallowing a dollar coin.

"That dollar coin cost a lot of money," she said.

Her advice was "keep dogs out of compost and bins".


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