The 25-year-old was shocked to find her bikini was see-through. Picture: Emily
The 25-year-old was shocked to find her bikini was see-through. Picture: Emily

Women ’mortified’ by bikini malfunctions

Going for a dip shouldn't be anything like a wet T-shirt competition.

But when Emily Charlton-Smith stepped into a pool in a white bikini, that's pretty much what happened.

The 25-year-old from London took to social media recently to share the cringe-worthy details of a recent trip to a swimming pool that left her "mortified".

Emily Charlton-Smith was left ‘mortified’ when her bikini — this white Bow Bikini from Pretty Little Thing — became see-through in the water. Picture: Supplied
Emily Charlton-Smith was left ‘mortified’ when her bikini — this white Bow Bikini from Pretty Little Thing — became see-through in the water. Picture: Supplied

Rocking a white bandeau strapless bikini when from Pretty Little Thing she couldn't believe it when the swimmers became completely see-through as soon as it touched the water.

Confused and embarrassed after giving her friends an eyeful, she contacted the online fashion brand who asked for video evidence the $30 swimmers - called the Bow Bikini - were faulty.

Emily sent photographs, which she modelled against her hand, both dry and wet to show the difference.

Emily sent photos of the swimmers dry and wet against her hand to show they were see-through. Picture: Fox News/Emily Charlton-Smith
Emily sent photos of the swimmers dry and wet against her hand to show they were see-through. Picture: Fox News/Emily Charlton-Smith

But while the representative then apologised for the confusion, Emily was told this "can happen with white items if made wet" - especially with bikinis advertised for "poolside posing," meaning that they are not meant to go into the water.

 

 

"The best and most mortifying part is that they said bikinis are for 'poolside posing,'" she told Fox News. "I'd understand if it was a glittery, jewelled bikini, but it's so basic."

Emily shared her ordeal online, where she said she had "so many people express their frustrations for me and some have similar experiences".

The only reason Emily purchased the white bikini was because she already had it in black and thought it was great.

The 25-year-old was shocked by the fact so many others have had similar experiences. Picture: Instagram/Emily Charlton-Smith
The 25-year-old was shocked by the fact so many others have had similar experiences. Picture: Instagram/Emily Charlton-Smith

"The fit was great and the quality was thick enough," she told the publication of the black version, adding that she assumed the white version was equally an good standard.

"Also, the white bikini was more expensive, which I assumed was due to the material being thicker to avoid this situation," she added. The black version currently sells for $25.

Despite accidentally giving her friends and other pool goers an X-rated flash of her flesh, Emily can see the funny side, posting photos of her with hilarious captions during her trip to Spain.

 

 

 

"You have to laugh," she said, adding that her tweet to PrettyLittleThing branding the situation "not cool" had gone viral.

Since sharing news of her transparent bikini online, Emily said the store had apologised and offered her a refund.

MORE 'FAULTY' SWIMMERS

But sadly, it's not the first time this brand has made global headlines for catching out unsuspecting beach and pool goers with its "poolside posing only" small print.

In May, a 22-year-old woman from Wales in the UK was left with the shock of her life when she went for a dip and turned "blue like a smurf".

Alisha purchased a $110 teal swimsuit from Pretty Little Thing, but when she wore it at a spa, she ended up covered in blue dye.

The surprised Brit told BuzzFeed she had worn it in the shower at her gym. When she then entered the sauna, she saw "dye running down my legs".

Emily isn't alone, with a woman from Wales complaining after turning ‘blue like a smurf’ in a similar incident. Picture: Twitter
Emily isn't alone, with a woman from Wales complaining after turning ‘blue like a smurf’ in a similar incident. Picture: Twitter

"I was stained blue, and it destroyed my towel," she explained.

However, when she contacted the budget fashion retailer, she was told "on the website it does say that the set shouldn't be worn in water".

The customer service rep also pointed out that this bikini's official designation is "for poolside posing only".

"Be cautious when buying SWIMwear from @OfficialPLT," she wrote on Twitter. "Because it's only for 'poolside posing' and they'll still charge you, absolutely laughable."

 

Her tweet blew up fast, receiving over 79,000 likes and 25,00 retweets, mostly from outraged shoppers who branded the bikini a "nightmare".

 

 

 

 

The online debacle caught the attention of Pretty Little Thing, and the company later refunded Alisha for the "faulty" bikini - but people still couldn't get over the "poolside posing" only listing.

As some pointed out, how do you wash it? The mind boggles.

COUNTLESS BIKINI DRAMAS

This isn't the first time a bikini has suffered a major problem, with social media users pointing out a "painful" issue with the duct tape bikini trend in March.

While the barely-there design has been a huge trend for 2019, many questioned how on earth you'd go to the bathroom when wearing one.

 

The "naked bra" trend was also recently slammed online, as no one could figure out how to get into it.

 

Would you risk wearing any of these trendy swimwear pieces or do you think they're just ridiculous? Let us know in the comments below. You can also continue the conversation @RebekahScanlan | rebekah.scanlan@news.com.au


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