Trauma Toys
Trauma Toys

Mum’s handmade toys help most vulnerable

An "overreaction" call to police by loved ones has led to a Townsville woman finding her passion for helping kids in their hour of need.

Marion Gough founded Trauma Toys Townsville in June, an operation where she creates plush toys for local children involved in car crashes, domestic violence situations and so on.

"It hasn't been going too bad, I'm quite happy to sit at home and crochet," Ms Gough said.

"It's become such a passion now, all I want to do is sit and crochet. I sat for five days straight and just crocheted at one stage."

Marion Gough founder Trauma Toys Townsville, with some of her crochet toys to be donated to children affected by traumatic situations. Picture: Shae Beplate.
Marion Gough founder Trauma Toys Townsville, with some of her crochet toys to be donated to children affected by traumatic situations. Picture: Shae Beplate.

 

Ms Gough said Trauma Toys Townsville was born out of a twist of fate when the police knocked on her door.

"I have bad panic attacks and they can last up to 12 minutes," she said.

"I was on the phone to my son in Charters Towers when I had one. They didn't know what was happening and they called the police because they thought it might have been a suicide attempt.

"Dale was one of the officers who came around to do a welfare check and she noticed all the toys around my place. I love making them.

"She said you should make trauma toys and it took off from there. All from a phone call which was an overreaction."

 

After three months, Ms Gough's efforts have made waves through the community as children receive a comforting item as they deal with potentially horrific tragedy.

She said it's great her work is being embraced by both the police and civilians.

"Recently 13-year-old girl asked her friends for money for her birthday instead of presents.

"She donated the $160 she received to us. It's incredible a girl that age can be so generous.

"I've made a jellyfish toy in rose gold and cream in her honour and named it JennaJelly.

"A worker from Evolution Mine also collected cans and with the recycle money bought us 140 balls of wool."

Ms Gough said the police at the Rasmussen station alone dealt with 100 DV related incidents a week.

It's for this reason she's calling on more people to help make toys or donate material.

"The demand for them is huge, absolutely huge.

"We really need more crafters, whether it's sewing or whatever. We just need more toys; I'm only one person and can only do so much.

"They're not just for kids, they've been given to dementia patients and mental health patients."

 

Originally published as Mum's handmade toys help most vulnerable


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