MEET THE CAPTAINS: Sunshine Beach State High School Year 12 school leaders for 2020, Alfie Rowley and Emily Snell. Photo: Caitlin Zerafa
MEET THE CAPTAINS: Sunshine Beach State High School Year 12 school leaders for 2020, Alfie Rowley and Emily Snell. Photo: Caitlin Zerafa

‘Music nerds’ ready to hit right notes

THEY are the future of our world but right now their focus is on making it through the biggest time of their schooling life: Year 12.

Noosa News is meeting the captains from local high schools for an informal conversation about the year ahead and their thoughts on the world.

This year’s seniors were the first cohort to transition in to high school in Year 7 and will be the first to be examined under the new ATAR system which has been introduced to replace the previous OP system.

Today we spoke with Sunshine Beach State High School captains Alfie Rowley and Emily Snell.

MEET THE CAPTAINS: Sunshine Beach State High School Year 12 school leaders for 2020, Alfie Rowley and Emily Snell with Year 9 captains Margot Lamarque and Harvey Lawton. Photo: Caitlin Zerafa
MEET THE CAPTAINS: Sunshine Beach State High School Year 12 school leaders for 2020, Alfie Rowley and Emily Snell with Year 9 captains Margot Lamarque and Harvey Lawton. Photo: Caitlin Zerafa

How long have you both been at the school?

Alfie: Grade 7. We were actually in the same class when we came in. It’s very strange having two music people being elected as the captains in our school, I think it’s actually the first time in our history.

Emily: Or as long as we know, or at least as far as the teachers know.

What are you most looking forward to for Year 12?

Alfie: Driving to school every day, no! Probably enjoy the last I’ll see of my friends everyday, it’s cherishing the time that I have with them.

Emily: I’m a huge nerd, I love organisation so exam preperation for the ATAR’s.

What are your academic interests?

Alfie: I’m doing PE, which is actually a lot harder than I thought it would be. I did music with Emily, but I’m also doing extension as well, so it’s pretty much another subject, and a healthy amount of extra ATAR points, which I’m going to reap the rewards I hope, I hope. And drama and normal English and normal maths. More of the artsy subjects.

Emily: I finished Grade 12 music last year so I’m doing environmental, biology, math methods, literature and literature extension.

Tell me about your music, what are you into?

Alfie: Mostly jazz, so the alto sax and the piano. So the very jazzy instruments. It’s been my passion since about Grade 8.

What are your plans after school?

Alfie: I’d like to actually get myself into radio. I’m hoping to start off in promotions and from there I can one day move up and become a host. I would like to incorporate it (music) into my job if I get into radio but I guess I’ll see what the future holds. Life plans aren’t the smartest thing to have because they will never go right and make you more stressed, so I think guidelines are the smarter way to look at it.

Emily: Straight into university. I want to do a double degree in science and professional communication majoring in the natural world sciences. So probably biology but looking at it not from a DNA perspective, but from the natural world.

MEET THE CAPTAINS: Sunshine Beach State High School Year 12 school leaders for 2020, Alfie Rowley and Emily Snell. Photo: Caitlin Zerafa
MEET THE CAPTAINS: Sunshine Beach State High School Year 12 school leaders for 2020, Alfie Rowley and Emily Snell. Photo: Caitlin Zerafa

What type of legacy as leaders do you hope to leave for the school?

Emily: We really want to improve our leadership structure to really enhance the effectiveness of what we instil in the school. We are putting in place a tee planting program every year for Year 12. I think the main thing is trying to put forth our leadership as a role model for others.

Do you have a quirky before or after school routine that you just can’t get through your day without?

Alfie: Mum says I spend way too much time in the car, not when it’s on, it’s just getting ready, like getting music on, making sure I’ve go the right glasses on, making sure the car starts, which is, my particular car, it’s kind of a 50/50 chance it will happen! It’s always exciting. It’s a 63 Volkswagen Beetle and I affectionately call it Herbie. I love classic cars.

Emily: I need to wake up an extra half-hour early just to drink my cup of tea and when I get overwhelming I really need to watch a really trashy TV show and I net.

You are the first year level to go through the new ATAR system in Queensland. What are you thoughts on ATAR vs. OP?

Alfie: Teh ATAR system is terrifying but I’m sure it’s much better than the OP system. Teh ATAR system is very personal, I think it could actually improve marks. I’m hoping so, just means I’ve got to work very hard, not that I wouldn't with the OP system, but just a little more.

Emily: I think the ATAR system is a lot better than the OP system, I’m grateful for it. I also think because it’s not marked on your cohort but rather yourself, and I think also we have a lot less assessment that the OP system just from hearing from the year above. It is nerve-racking to think that 50 per cent of your mark from sciences and maths contribute to your ATAR and I think, like any education, it can always improve but I’m happy with it.


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