A Sydney man is facing trial in the Lismore District Court for allegedly supplying cocaine. Picture: iStock
A Sydney man is facing trial in the Lismore District Court for allegedly supplying cocaine. Picture: iStock

'Odd coincidences' in case against alleged cocaine supplier

THE circumstances involving a man accused of supplying a large amount of cocaine at Wardell is an "odd coincidence", a court has heard.

Jasper Nash, 33, from Homebush West, earlier this year pleaded not guilty to supplying a large commercial quantity of cocaine.

His barrister, Simon Apps, told Lismore District Court on Thursday there was no evidence tying his client to the supply of the prohibited drugs.

Police allege Mr Nash, who is also known as Stephanie Adoray Nash, drove from Sydney and met with his co-accused, 36-year-old Kurrajong man Scott Christopher Pritchard, on River Dr, Wardell, in April 2019.

During this time, Mr Nash allegedly transferred 12 cryovac sealed bags containing 11kg of cocaine from his vehicle to Pritchard's vehicle.

It is alleged he transported the drugs in a gas cylinder bottle in the boot of his car.

The pair then parted ways before Pritchard was later stopped by Tweed Byron Police District officers and found with the bags of cocaine in his vehicle.

Pritchard has since pleaded guilty to supplying a large commercial quantity of cocaine.

It's alleged when police stopped Mr Nash near Ulmarra, they found almost $2000 and two mobile phones in his car.

Throughout the trial, the court has heard Mr Nash told police he'd borrowed his sister's boyfriend's vehicle to go fishing with his friend on the Richmond River.

Mr Apps said despite police finding the fingerprints of the owner of Mr Nash's vehicle on the bags of drugs, there was no evidence his client was involved in transporting the cocaine.

He added despite police surveillance sighting Mr Nash's vehicle and Mr Pritchard's vehicle parked near each other at Wardell, there was no evidence either men interacted either in person or via telephone.

"There's no DNA consistent of Mr Nash's DNA on either of the gas bottles, there is no fingerprints or DNA on the rubber bands found in the gas bottle, no DNA or fingerprints match Mr Nash on the bags containing the drugs, no fingerprints or DNA on the car Mr Pritchard was in," Mr Apps said.

Judge Jeffrey McLennan said the Crown Prosecution's case seemed to be relying on "odd coincidences".

"It's a coincidence two cars Mr Pritchard has had some dealings with turn up at the same location," Judge McLennan said.

"It's a bit of a coincidence they both have hollowed out LPG cylinders.

"There's no evidence where Mr Pritchard had been that morning.

"There's no evidence Mr Nash knew Mr Pritchard.

"There's a lot of speculation based on those very basic coincidence."

The Crown Prosecutor did admit to the court there were "only inferences, there is no direct evidence" Mr Nash physically supplied the drugs.

The trial was adjourned to Monday, where Judge McLennan is expected to hand down his judgment in Lismore District Court.


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