Didier Kobi

OPINION: Is technology taking over our lives?

I DON'T think I'm ready for the latest wave of technological gadgets headed our way in 2015.

Three weeks after Christmas, I'm still struggling to master the finer points of operating the really rather easy-to-use coffee machine that Santa left under the tree.

So it was with some concern I read this week that the internet is about to enable a whole range of household gadgets to do amazing things to make our lives even easier.

Move over shiny, new coffee machine, there's a wi-fi version on the way that enables you to request your cuppa remotely from your smartphone.

Never mind that you might want your coffee first thing in the morning and you haven't yet left your house.

And while remote-controlled ovens have already been dished up to an appreciative few, it appears they can now be controlled by your voice.

It gets better. If you can't be bothered speaking, there's a ring you can wear that enables you to control things - TV, lights and possibly coffee machines - with a wave of your hand.

Too taxing to wave your hand? How about the 'home brain wave measurer'? It's a little headset device designed to 'read your thoughts' and use the data to help you relax!

All a bit too invasive? That's nothing compared to The Belty. This little gem apparently keeps check on your waistline and adjusts your belt accordingly.

Just what we all need!

It's all too much to contemplate. The internet is great, but are we enabling it to take over our lives?


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