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Resort seeds Landcare plant

Noosa Landcare's Connor Moss 'digs' the hole while Peppers Noosa general manager Steve McPharlin and  Noosa Landcare general manager Phil Moran consider which tree to plant.
Noosa Landcare's Connor Moss 'digs' the hole while Peppers Noosa general manager Steve McPharlin and Noosa Landcare general manager Phil Moran consider which tree to plant. Alan Lander

IT'S always a good feeling when a major corporation steps in to help the environment.

Especially when it's the Noosa shire environment.

But that's what the 195-room Peppers Noosa Resort has done, by partnering up with Noosa and District Landcare and devising a $3 "levy” on every delegate who attends a Peppers conference.

And Peppers' open conference facility is the largest of its kind in Noosa, which helps.

This week, a group of Landcare workers, headed by general manager Phil Moran, planted 2200 trees in a rainforest remnant ecosystem next to Kin Kin Creek, just outside the little town's southern boundary, and all funded by the seven-year-old resort.

Vines to attract the endangered Richmond birdwing butterfly would also be planted later.

"Every conference delegate attendee contributes $3 to Noosa Landcare,” Peppers general manager Steve McPharlin said.

"We have more than

7000 over the year, so

we're aiming for $20,000 next year.

"We are willing to get our hands dirty.”

Mr McPharlin said delegates, when told, were "delighted” with their contribution.

"I couldn't think of a better partner than Landcare, and the guests are very happy with their participation.

"It gives the delegates a chance to give something back (to the land). All delegates are delighted we've done it.”

Mr Moran was well pleased with the arrangement, saying "Peppers is the first company to do this” - and hopes others may follow suit.

He said the planting would restore the riparian health of the riverbank and surrounds.

"We've used a large variety of rainforest tree species to increase biodiversity, to bring back wildlife, improve water quality and soil,” Mr Moran said.

"We took seeds out of the area, grew them to saplings at Pomona and brought them back, so the species are what would have been here before.”

He said Kin Kin averaged 66 inches (1676mm) in annual rainfall, so the growth would be "phenomenal”.

"We will plant the bird- wing vines in once they've grown a bit,” he said.

Mr Moran said Kin Kin people were "switched on” when it came to conservation.

"Kin Kin history showed there was fabulous rainforest around here; people moving to Kin Kin are aware of that history.

"They will contribute in their own ways.”

Topics:  environmental conservation kin kin landcare noosa peppers noosa resort


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