"I know my sharks mate: that's a great white'

A MASSIVE great white shark that menaced fishermen in two small boats on the weekend has done it before, a veteran off-shore fisherman says.

A huge shark circled and bumped the boat of a group of Sunshine Coast fishermen 36km off Mooloolaba at the Barwon Banks on the weekend.

"I know my sharks mate... that's a ... great white,'' one of the fisherman is heard exclaiming on a video shown on Channel 7 news on Wednesday night.

"Oh he's just had a go at your boat,'' he said, laughing.

"I just got him on film.''

Adam Cairns said the shark opened its mouth and dragged its teeth down the side of the boat.

Warwick Wolfe said he was just happy no-one fell out of the boat.

"I was thinking to myself 'Gee I hope they are holding on because I would hate to see someone fall into the water at that time.''

The encounter on Sunday is similar to one seen on a video posted in November last year where a shark is circling a whale carcass off Mooloolaba.

Above: video of an encounter with a shark off Mooloolaba from November last year

Barry McDade, of Currimundi, said the shark had seen him and two mates as tasty meals some 13 years ago.

He said he believed it has returned to familiar waters to repeat its sinister behaviour.

"I've met him before," Mr McDade said of the 5.8 metre monster and his characteristic behaviour.

The veteran charter fisherman said the great white had circled his 6.25m boat in late 2000 - he still has the Daily front page of the time as a memento of the ordeal.

"We looked over the side of the boat, and saw his eye looking up at us," he recalled.

"He swam about 10 to 30 feet away - he looked like he was leaving - then he turned and accelerated toward the boat.

"He hit the back quarter of the boat, I reckon, three or four times.

"When you've got something that big hitting the boat at the back quarter, he was trying to get us unbalanced, he wanted us out of the boat. He was a very hungry fish."

On Sunday, the shark was feeding on the remains of a whale carcass when the fishermen crashed its party.

"It was very very similar to what he did to us," Mr McDade said. "The only difference is he didn't have a whale to chew on."

He said the sharks normally followed the whale migrations to Hervey Bay, where they can pick off the younger calves, but this shark was around three weeks early.


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