SOULFUL: Mapstone are on the line up for the May Sound Feast at the J next Friday night.
SOULFUL: Mapstone are on the line up for the May Sound Feast at the J next Friday night. HANNAN PAUL

Talented acts to grace the stage

FEED your soul with some free live music at next week's Sound Feast at the J.

May 19 will see local and interstate guests grace the stage for a night of smooth grooving and dancing, including Mapstone from Byron Bay, Sunny Coast Rude Boys, Jeunae Rodgers, Sally Skelton and more.

Sunny Coast Rude Boys is a high energy eight-piece Ska band that shines brightest at Sound Feast - where high-quality production and the big stage are a perfect match for this exhilarating and rather large band.

Mapstone have quickly emerged onto the roots music scenes in Australia, Canada and Bali.

The bands dynamic repertoire and intriguing blend of voice, didgeridoo, percussion, guitars and harmonies gives them a unique ability to elevate and inspire any crowd.

Jeunae Rodgers is known for her ability to transition through musical styles and improvisation while staying honest to her musical roots.

She has played at numerous festivals including Woodford Folk Festival, Noosa Jazz Festival, Caloundra Music Festival and the Adelaide Fringe Festival.

You may have seen her performing at Noosa's Cafe Le Monde, but last week Sally Skelton was turning heads and chairs on The Voice. Kelly Rowland told her "you have a gift”, and now Sound Feast will be gifted with her presence and talent.


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