Some Aussies just want to celebrate Australia Day and not be shamed for it, writes Corrine Barraclough. Picture: iStock
Some Aussies just want to celebrate Australia Day and not be shamed for it, writes Corrine Barraclough. Picture: iStock

Truth Invasion Day protesters ignore

OPINION

When I first arrived in Australia 10 years ago, I'd never heard of Australia Day.

There was a lot of chatter in the office about what everyone was up to, talk of family gatherings, BBQs, fireworks, parties, yummy food and a real sense of pride in country.

We don't have an "England Day". There is no day when everyone comes together, waves flags and feels proud (that's not connected to the royals).

Quite simply, Australia Day is the official national day of Australia. I loved the simplicity of that.

Australia Day is for all Australians; no matter where we're originally from and it felt overwhelmingly inclusive.

Australia’s iconic beaches are usually packed with families and revellers on January 26, celebrating what it means to be Australian in great company. Picture: Sergio Dionisio/Getty Images
Australia’s iconic beaches are usually packed with families and revellers on January 26, celebrating what it means to be Australian in great company. Picture: Sergio Dionisio/Getty Images

I find it incredibly sad that now, years down the track, debate around our special, national day only seems to grow increasingly negative as time ticks by.

Anyone who calls it "Invasion Day" is looking to promote disunity.

Anyone who calls it "Survival Day" is missing out on the warmth this day offers.

There's even talk about "paying rent" for stolen land.

There doesn't need to be any controversy, angry hash tags or vitriol spat on social media. It's meant to be a day of solidarity, peace, celebration and pride.

Australia Day is, of course, each year on 26 January and celebrates the arrival of the First Fleet of British on Australian soil.

Australia was not invaded - it was settled. There was no warfare, no organised military resistance or conflict. The First Fleet came here with convicts in chains; it was not an invasion force. Certainly, starting a new chapter doesn't mean everything that's gone before is forgotten.

Protesters at an Invasion Day rally in Melbourne last year. Picture: AAP/James Ross.
Protesters at an Invasion Day rally in Melbourne last year. Picture: AAP/James Ross.

 

There are records of celebrating Australia Day dating back to 1808.

Now, it's a public holiday across all states and territories.

Doesn't everyone love a public holiday?

Doesn't everyone look forward to an extra day off work?

And yet, here we are in 2020, and furious protesters are waiting in the wings, ready to preach their religion of division.

If you're looking to find evidence of "oppression", you will always be able to find it.

If you're looking for opportunities to divide rather than bring people together, you will always find them.

If you're seeking to shout about "shame", you should take off your blinkers.

Australia is a wonderful country filled with caring, thoughtful, compassionate people. Just look at the incredible response to the bushfire crisis for proof of that.

This is not a racist country - and no one should feel "shame" for looking forward to celebrating this weekend.

This year, more than ever, we should be coming together.

Much as activists like to screech otherwise, the vast majority of people want to keep Australia Day on January 26 - and they want to celebrate freely.

A new poll from the Institute of Public Affairs (IPA) found that 75 per cent of Australians support Australia Day on January 26.

This is a huge number, especially considering the constant, monotonous and vocal efforts of the political left and pockets of mainstream media to oppose our national day.

The "woke" bullies with an agenda of bitterness have failed to divide us; that makes me even more proud. Perhaps I shall wave two flags.

 

Australia Day celebrations usually spill out into public spaces and are crammed with people keen to celebrate their country – not divide it. Picture: Supplied.
Australia Day celebrations usually spill out into public spaces and are crammed with people keen to celebrate their country – not divide it. Picture: Supplied.

"Mainstream Australians are fundamentally optimistic and positive about Australia and its values," said IPA Foundations of Western Civilisation Program director Dr Bella d'Abrera.

The survey found 88 per cent of people were "proud to be an Australian", with only 3 per cent disagreeing.

Only 10 per cent of Australians think the date should be changed. They will, no doubt, be the ones covered in glue this weekend.

On Sunday there are protests planned for "Invasion Day 2020" across the country, including Parliament House in Melbourne.

Perhaps we may see some familiar faces from other protests this year and some of the same loudmouths gluing themselves to the road in protest.

Its just noise, whether they're screaming about "climate justice" or "invasion justice".

People are sick of these disrupters.

 

Invasion Day protesters at Australia Day celebrations in Brisbane last year. Picture: AAP/Glenn Hunt.
Invasion Day protesters at Australia Day celebrations in Brisbane last year. Picture: AAP/Glenn Hunt.

The police should not be battling to maintain law and order against feral left-wing agitators. Their aim is to "burn down Australia".

We're in the middle of a bushfire crisis for god's sake; no wonder most people aren't on-board with the madness.

No, it doesn't make me "selfish" for celebrating.

Nor does it make me "insecure".

No, I'm not "ashamed".

No, I don't want to talk about "enslavement".

And no, caring about Australia Day does not mean that I don't care about the future of Aboriginal communities. Far from it.

I repeat: The majority of mainstream Australians are proud, they'll be celebrating and if you're not part of that, you're simply a tiny, resentful fringe minority.

Corrine Barraclough is a freelance writer and Sky News Australia contributor. She has never been a member of any political party, in any country, and never will be. Continue the conversation | @TweetCorrineB


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