Yesterday, a leaked internal government survey revealed strengthening public support for the anti-bikie laws.
Yesterday, a leaked internal government survey revealed strengthening public support for the anti-bikie laws. John Mccutcheon

WE SAY: Why government will tread carefully

OUR VIEW: CAMPBELL Newman hit the nail on the head after Brisbane's Stafford by-election defeat.

He announced that the government would reverse several controversial policy positions. The Crime and Corruption Commission chairman would again be a bipartisan appointment and jailed bikies would no longer be put in isolation.

Yesterday, a leaked internal government survey revealed strengthening public support for the anti-bikie laws.

They have had an effect. People feel safer. And police - from those in senior Brisbane operations to the Sunshine Coast beat - passionately and genuinely believe that the laws help them fight crime. But with the internal survey results came reports that the government may consider launching a new raft of anti-bikie laws.

A frightening public brawl in a restaurant on the Gold Coast and the subsequent siege of a police station sparked the introduction of the laws last year.

RELATED: More Queenslanders backing anti-bikie laws: survey

A response was called for, and it has shown results.

Official crime statistics, by and large, are down.

The fight has been won.

So to suggest the Newman government may be tempted to further beef up anti-bikie laws merely on a survey's results is a little churlish.

After all, acting to quell vicious and lawless behaviour and acting on a survey's results are far different.