Australian women and the allies who marched with them during a "furious reckoning" about sexism and rape culture on Monday have made headlines around the world.

Tens of thousands joined March For Justice rallies in cities around the country and outside Parliament House in Canberra demanding cultural change.

Former Liberal staffer Brittany Higgins, who claimed she was raped inside a parliamentary office and sexual assault survivor and Australian of the Year Grace Tame delivered powerful speeches in Canberra and Hobart respectively.

It was a significant moment in Australian history that did not go unnoticed by the world's media. Time Magazine, the BBC, The New York Times, The Washington Post, the Irish Times and Al Jazeera each dedicated significant coverage to the events.

Time Magazine's headline read:'We've Had Enough.' Furious Australian Women Force a Reckoning on Sexism After a Rape Allegation in the Government.

The publication's story touched on how deeply ingrained the culture of sexism and sexual harassment has become.

"Furious women across Australia are now opening up with their own experiences of sexism, sexual harassment and sexual abuse," it read. "And it's begun conversations about inherent discrimination and mistreatment of women - both within the halls of Australian government, and across the wider society."

Al Jazeera made note of the historic rape allegation against Attorney-General Christian Porter and the allegations of inappropriate behaviour against Craig Kelly's political advisor, Frank Zumbo.

"Allegations have been laid by six women against a senior parliamentary aide Frank Zumbo, drawing attention to what many critics say is a toxic culture of masculinity within the nation's federal parliament," Al Jazeera wrote.

"Prime Minister Scott Morrison continues to refuse to hold an independent inquiry into the allegations against Porter, and on Monday also refused to meet protesters on the parliament's lawn in Canberra."

The New York Times made mention of the longstanding issues Australia has failed to address.

"Wearing black and holding signs reading; enough is enough', thousands took to the streets across Australia on Monday to protest violence and discrimination against women, as a reckoning in the country's halls of power sparked by multiple accusations of rape continued to grow," the Times wrote.

"The marches in at least 40 cities represented an outpouring of anger from women about a problem that has gone unaddressed for too long, said the organisers, who estimated that 110,000 people attended the demonstrations nationwide.

"With the next national election potentially coming as early as August, experts say it is something that the conservative government, which has come under stinging criticism for the way it has handled the accusations, ignores at its own peril.

The Washington Post celebrated those who took to the streets with messages denouncing the ongoing poor treatment of women.

"(Protesters) carried placards decrying misogyny, victim-blaming, abuse and rape," the newspaper wrote.

"In Melbourne, a banner listed 900 women who have lost their lives at the hands of men since 2008. The rallies follow a wave of allegations of sexual assault, abuse and misconduct in some of the highest offices of Australian politics.

"They come amid a growing global movement demanding officials do more to protect women and to hold perpetrators of harassment and assaults accountable.

"The reckoning over assault allegations has reached the highest ranks of government. On Monday, the country's top law official filed a defamation suit against the state broadcaster over an article that reported a letter had been sent to the prime minister containing a historic rape allegation."

The BBC wrote that Monday's rallies "could be the biggest uprising of women that Australia's seen. And the Irish Times wrote that "public anger over the government's handling of the alleged incidents mirrors the sentiment on display at protests in London over the weekend following the killing of 33-year-old Sarah Everard, who disappeared while walking home at night-time".

"Mr Morrison said Australia had made big strides toward gender equality over the years, though he acknowledged the job was 'far from done' and he shared the concerns of the protesters.

However, he raised some hackles by expressing pride in the right to peaceful protest when he said 'Not far from here, such marches, even now, are being met with bullets, but not in this country.'"

Originally published as World reacts to Australia's 'uprising'


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